Scene Name Attribute

Lots of times, I have scripts that need to be configured with the name of a specific scene. A button might need the name of the menu it loads when clicked, or a door trigger might need to know which level to transition to. Scenes are represented by strings, and therefore are easy to mistype in the Inspector. But in the editor, we have the luxury of a comprehensive list of the scenes in our build, something I leveraged before in my Scene Switch window. Let’s use that same idea to power an attribute (and attribute drawer) to provide a convenient and friendly way to enforce correct scene names every time.

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Pool Manager

When I started to understand the importance of object pooling in Unity, I had a hard time finding an implementation that fit my needs. I love the asset store and frequently indulge in purchases that may someday be useful on any one of a dozen ideas I have at the back of my mind – some gamers have a Steam backlog, I have an Asset Store backlog! But in this case, I really just wanted something simple and free. I didn’t need my pool manager to have a ton of fancy features, nor did I want to take on a lot of overhead altering the objects I wanted to pool.

So, I went with a homegrown solution. My implementation simply serves up an instance of the desired prefab: either a reactivated instance from the pool or, if there are no available pooled objects, a newly-instantiated one. This pool manager only manages one prefab each, so it would need retooling to be applicable on a game with lots of different pooled objects. But in situations where just one type shows up frequently and the size of the pool doesn’t increase dramatically over time (tiles in a puzzle game, asteroids in Voyager), it works grand:

// --------------------------------
// <copyright file="UnityPoolManager.cs" company="Rumor Games">
//     Copyright (C) Rumor Games, LLC.  All rights reserved.
// </copyright>
// --------------------------------

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Globalization;
using UnityEngine;

/// <summary>
/// UnityPoolManager class.
/// </summary>
public class UnityPoolManager : MonoBehaviour
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Template object to copy.
    /// </summary>
    public GameObject prefab;

    /// <summary>
    /// Whether to reparent the object on pooling.
    /// </summary>
    public bool reparent = true;

    /// <summary>
    /// If reparenting objects, the Transform to parent active objects under.
    /// </summary>
    [HideUnless("reparent")]
    public Transform activeParent;

    /// <summary>
    /// If reparenting objects, the Transform to parent inactive objects under.
    /// </summary>
    [HideUnless("reparent")]
    public Transform inactiveParent;

    /// <summary>
    /// Data structure backing pool.
    /// </summary>
    private Stack<GameObject> pool;

    /// <summary>
    /// Number of instances created of each object type.
    /// </summary>
    private IDictionary<string, int> instanceCount;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initialize script state.
    /// </summary>
    internal virtual void Awake()
    {
        this.pool = new Stack<GameObject>();
        this.instanceCount = new Dictionary<string, int>();
        if (this.inactiveParent == null)
        {
            this.inactiveParent = this.transform;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Get an object from the pool if available, otherwise creates a new instance.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>An object from the pool.</returns>
    public GameObject Get()
    {
        GameObject poolObject;

        // try to get from pool first
        if (this.pool.Count > 0)
        {
            poolObject = this.pool.Pop();
        }
        else
        {
            if (!this.instanceCount.ContainsKey(this.prefab.name))
            {
                this.instanceCount.Add(this.prefab.name, 0);
            }

            // if pool is empty, create a new instance
            poolObject = Instantiate(this.prefab);
            poolObject.name = string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "{0}({1})", this.prefab.name, this.instanceCount[this.prefab.name]);
            poolObject.transform.SetParent(this.inactiveParent, false);

            this.instanceCount[this.prefab.name]++;
        }

        // reparent if desired
        if (this.reparent)
        {
            poolObject.transform.SetParent(this.activeParent, false);
        }

        // activate object
        poolObject.SetActive(true);

        return poolObject;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Release an object back to the pool.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="poolObject">Object to release.</param>
    public void Release(GameObject poolObject)
    {
        // deactivate object
        poolObject.SetActive(false);

        // reparent if desired
        if (this.reparent)
        {
            poolObject.transform.SetParent(this.inactiveParent, false);
        }
        
        // return to pool
        this.pool.Push(poolObject);
    }
}

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Hide in Inspector

Editor scripting in Unity is one of the more powerful tools available for improving workflow. It’s great to be able to write my own editor window to add new features to the editor, but I’m in love with the flexibility that I get from custom property drawers. Unity has a few built in examples that you’re probably familiar with: SerializeField, Range, and of course, HideInInspector. Simple attributes that can be applied to any field that have a dramatic effect on how those fields get used. Want a field to be private, but editable in the inspector? SerializeField. Public, but not editable? HideInInspector. So helpful!

But of course, there are plenty of other scenarios in which I might want to hide things in the editor. Let’s say I have a class with several fields to configure:

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Bindable Values

Let’s say I want Script B to perform some logic whenever a variable in Script A changes. It’s a pretty basic problem, but unfortunately, one that is rarely given the attention it deserves. I’d like to discuss some of the common ways of approaching the task, and share one of the tools I use to make my implementations easier and more consistent.

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Custom Script Templates

I hate busywork. Whenever I add a new script to a Unity project, it comes with some requisite amount of whitespace cleanup, re-commenting, and other housekeeping I need to do just to get ready to start writing code. Luckily, that boilerplate code isn’t baked into Unity, it comes from a template that, get this, you can replace.

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Setting up a Framework Directory

The first step to creating a great reusable development framework is to have a way of effortlessly sharing code across multiple projects. This is a little trickier than one might expect in Unity. Assets need to be a part of the project directory to be usable. Initially, I tried to follow the Asset Store model, exporting reusable assets as a Unity package and importing that into new projects. Unfortunately, this was a maintenance nightmare. Every minor update required a new export and a gaggle of imports.

I decided a better approach was to use symbolic links. This allowed me to maintain a single Framework folder, and with a tiny bit of setup, for that folder to appear seamlessly in all of my Unity projects.

Here’s how it works:

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Global Game Jam 2015

This year was my second time participating in the Global Game Jam, and my third 48-hour jam overall. Along that storied history, I’ve learned a few things about how to be an effective and successful (defined here as ending the jam with a playable prototype that isn’t embarrassing for something made in a weekend) jammer. Here are some of those learnings, distilled into handy, categorized-tip form.

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Apophis

Trouble with Apophis? As the final mission in the Grand Tour, Apophis is meant to be challenging! It requires mastery of the Thruster, an omni-directional rocket controlled with a virtual thumbstick. The objective is dramatic change of pace as well. Rather than attempting to scan the target for data, the mission literally puts the world on the line. Draw the asteroid off its collision course with Earth,  before it’s too late!

Plenty of people have questions about how to pull this off. If you’re looking for some insight, check out this demonstration.

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Full Circle

Voyager began as a Windows Phone 7 game, and Voyager: Grand Tour would not exist if not for our dedicated and supportive Windows Phone fans. Now, at last, Windows Phone users can experience the new levels, beautiful visuals, and dramatic replays of Voyager: Grand Tour!

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